Sprouty sprouts

Finally, we learnt how to sprout… after many attempts and many sprouts-to-be in the bin.

It turns out, it’s a lot easier than I thought.  All the great amazon books I got on sprouting were way overqualified for a simple job.  As it turns out, you just pick your favourite beans or pulses (e.g. chickpeas, mung beans, or lentils) and soak them fully in drinking water for a few hours (e.g. 6 or more).  Then, drain the water and just put them in a damp cotton cloth and tie loosely; leave them anywhere in the kitchen (not in the fridge).  Everyday, check on them and make sure they are not dry.  If the water has dried up, just sprinkle them with a bit more water to keep them moist.  Before you know it, they’ll start growing roots and they’ll be ready.  Each bean takes a different amount of time.  It could be anywhere from 2-5 days (or thereabouts).

Once you have the lovely sprouts, you can add them to your salads or just about anything. I put them in my veggie maki last week.  They are delicious and are powerhouses of nutrition!  I prefer to use organic beans and pulses for sprouting.  And you can sprout other stuff too like sunflower seeds and quinoa.

There are several methods for sprouting… if you’ve tried any other method, let me know.  I’m sure others will benefit from your experience.  ‘Leave a comment’ below…

Nature Valley’s sprouted bread

Speaking of organic, I met up with Dr. Lamya Shehabee the other day (she runs the healthfood store Nature Valley here in Bahrain); she let me try her brand new sprouted bread!  It’s so great and such a great alternative to regular bread.  It’s called Ezekiel bread.  You’ve gotta try it, it’s yummy.

I read about an idea for a sprout salad where you mix all kinds of sprouts with some chopped greens and use blended mangoes as dressing.  Sounds yummy, huh?  I’ll let you know if it’s any good once I’ve tried it.

Till then, stay healthy!

And don’t forget to sign up on my website for all the juicy info www.AliaAlmoayed.com

3 responses to “Sprouty sprouts

  1. I had my first experiment with sprouting this week also! I tried out organic red clover seeds that I purchased online over a year ago and am now just finally getting around to try! Like you I was a bit overwhelemed with all the methods out there, they just made it sound so complicated. I ended up using my frying pan splatter screen as the tray for my sprouts (red clover seeds are very small and the mesh on the screen is the perfect size). 2 days later and I have lots of little sprout tails sticking out the bottom of the screen and some seed leaves unfolding on the top of the screen. I sampled a few of the largest sprouts this morning and they are yummy. Nice and green with a hint of sweetness and a bit of a bite like radish sprouts. I’m very interested to try sprouting beans next and will use your cloth method (probalby cheesecloth tied up to make a bag). Love reading all of your posts!!!

  2. Salaam everyone,
    i was a regular with sprouting beans some time back.
    My 3 yr old son also enjoyed picking out each ‘small plant’, i taught him what was root and stem and leaves, and how good it was for him.
    Just by eating them in front of him I was setting an example of good nutrition.
    Then I found out that contaminated seeds, in the conditions required to grow sprouts (e.g, warmth and humidity) lead to rapid growth of bacteria like Escherichia Coli and Salmonella.
    So I completely stopped growing sprouts. Do you suggest that using organic seeds is completely safe?
    Please advise.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s